Wednesday, June 02, 2010

Polaroid peel-apart instant film types: Examples galore!

Okay, previously I've done posts about peel-apart film, and integral film, and the cameras that can be used with whatever film. Since then I've used many types and had much more experience with the different film types. I figure it's time to make a big list of film types, with examples, that I can update as I find out and try new types. I haven't been doing much recently, so this will make a good filler post that is, with luck, informative! If there isn't a photo, I haven't used it and don't have an example (yet). This post is for peel-apart pack films only.

Type 100 Peel-apart Films, 3.25 x 4.25

Type 105 (ISO 75 BW - print and negative) - Became 665. I haven't encountered a working pack. Polaroid states that "this film produces within 30 seconds a brilliant positive and a negative for high quality prints."

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Type 107 (ISO 3000 BW) - Became 107c and then 667, though Type 107 has much more contrast, without the sepia tones that 667 sometimes exhibits.

Type 107c (ISO 3000 BW). The same as 107, but does not require fixer. The "c" stands for coaterless.

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Type 084 (ISO 3000 BW) - I haven't ever seen a box of this, but it's a professional version of Type 107.

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Type 108 (ISO 75 color) - Became 669. It has the same blue qualities as 669 when it expires.

Type 108 Polacolor 2 - Basically the same as Type 108, probably with improved color. Polaroid described the film as having "special metallized dyes that produce vivid, fade-resistant colors".

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Type 125i (ISO 125) - Described by Polaroid as a "medium-speed, medium-contrast, medium-grain, daylight and electronic flash balanced (5500°K) color print film. It’s easy to use photo document film with true-to-life colors, for sharp, bright, portrait quality images, anytime, everytime."

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Type 125i Silk (ISO 125 color) - 125i with a textured/matte surface.

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Studio 125 (ISO 125 color) - Probably the same thing as 125i, though not sold in the U.S. market. Described by Polaroid as a "medium-speed, medium-contrast, medium-grain, daylight and electronic flash balanced (5500°K) color print film. This film features accurate colors and bright whites; sharp, vibrant, saturated proofs and final art; lower contrast for greater detail when compared to Polaroid Pro 100 film; improved reciprocity characteristics, and fast clearing and drying."

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Type 606 (ISO 200 sepia) - Probably super rare. Described by Polaroid as "a panchromatic, medium-contrast pack film producing sepia-tone prints with excellent gradation and tonal range."

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Type 611 (ISO 200 BW) - For ultrasound photography, described by Polaroid as "medium-speed, low-contrast, medium-grain, black and white coaterless print film."

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Type 612 (ISO 20,000 BW) -  Designed for CRT recording.

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Type 661 (ISO 80 color) - Marketed as "Special Program Film." The ISO states 80, but it is much slower than Type 669, though it seems to have the same tones.

Type 663 (ISO 800 BW) - Sold by Impossible Project for a short time. I'm not sure if this was an official Polaroid product or a custom film.

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Type 664 (ISO 100 BW) - Described by Polaroid as "medium-speed, medium-contrast sheet film for black and white prints. Coaterless, wide tonal range, intended for exposures of 1/10 second or faster, matches speed of ISO 100 chrome films."

Polaroid Pro 100 (ISO 100 BW) - Repackaged Type 664, described as "medium-speed, medium-contrast sheet film for black and white prints. Coaterless, wide tonal range, intended for exposures of 1/10 second or faster, matches speed of ISO 100 chrome films."

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Type 665 (ISO 80 BW - print and negative) - Described by Polaroid as "medium-speed, medium-contrast, fine-grain film which produces high quality black and white prints and negatives suitable for enlarging."

Type 667 (ISO 3000 BW) - What came from Type 107c, though with warmer tones than 107 and 107c. Polaroid described it as "high-speed, medium-contrast, medium-grain, general purpose black & white coaterless print film."

Type 3200B (ISO 3000 BW) - This is the same thing as 667, probably renamed for professional use. 3200 is probably the specific ISO of Type 667, as some literature states "approximately 3000" for the ISO.

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Type 668 (ISO 80 color) - Probably a precursor to Type 669, after Type 108 Polacolor 2.

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Type 669 (ISO 80 color) - The next evolutionary step from Type 108. Described by Polaroid as "medium-contrast, medium-speed, daylight (5500°K), (electronic flash) balanced color print film with extended dynamic range." This is (was) the most popular peel-apart film.

Type 669 Silk (ISO 80 color) - I've never seen this, but I assume it's the same as Type 669 with a textured/matte surface.

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Polacolor 100 (ISO 100) - For passport photo use. I don't know much about it, except it seems to have similar blue tones as Type 669.

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Polacolor 100 Silk (ISO 100) - The same as above, except with a textured/matte surface, for passport photo use. I don't know much about it, except it seems to have similar blue tones as Type 669.

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Type 672 (ISO 400 BW) - Described by Polaroid as a "panchromatic, medium-contrast film producing fine grain prints with excellent gradation and tonal range."

Polapan Pro 400 - Repackaged Type 672. Described by Polaroid as a "panchromatic, medium-contrast film producing fine grain prints with excellent gradation and tonal range."

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Type 679 (ISO 100 color) - This is probably the precursor to Type 690, as it has similar yellow tones and the developer paste is blue and yellow. Described by Polaroid as "medium-speed, medium-contrast, medium-grain, daylight and electronic flash balanced (5500°K) color print film. This film features accurate colors and bright whites; sharp, vibrant, saturated proofs and final art; lower contrast for greater detail when compared to Polaroid Pro 100 film; improved reciprocity characteristics, and fast clearing and drying."

Type 681 (ISO 80 color) - A film created for ID photography, it has plastic base instead of paper for durability.

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Type 689/ProVivid (ISO 100 color) - This might be the same base film that Fuji uses for FP-100C. Described by Polaroid as "medium-speed, medium-contrast, medium-grain, daylight and electronic flash balanced (5500° K) color print film."

Type 690 (ASA 100 color) - Probably followed 679, as it has similar yellow tones. Polaroid describes it as "medium-speed, medium-contrast, medium-grain, daylight and electronic flash balanced (5500°K) color print film. It’s easy to use, professional quality instant film, with sharp, bright, well-saturated colors, anytime, every time."

Type 690 (ASA 125 color) - Some have mentioned this. I assume it is a non-U.S. market version of Type 690.

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Type 691 (ASA 80) - Described by Polaroid as a film that "provides a full-color positive transparency suitable for projection. The transparency is processed and ready for use within minutes".

64 Tungsten (ASA 64 color) - Described by Polaroid as "special tungsten (3200°K) balanced film for rich, saturated color prints, in 31/4 x 41/4 pack format. Color-balanced for tungsten lighting, rich and saturated colors, excellent image sharpness and clarity, designed for long exposures (ideal @ 1/2 to 30 seconds)."

ID-UV (ISO 80 color) - Most likely the same as 669, with an ultraviolet coating. Described by Polaroid as a "medium-speed, medium-contrast, medium-grain, daylight (electronic flash) balanced color print film with security features."

PC ID-UV 100 (ISO 100 color) - Sold only in Europe, this is probably the same thing as 690 with an ultraviolet coating. Described by Polaroid as a medium-speed, medium-contrast, medium-grain, daylight (electronic flash) balanced color print film with security features."

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100 Blue (ISO 80) - This film, as described by Impossible Project "features gentle monochromatic blue tones ranging from lilac to deep blue". It has a textured/matte surface.

100 Chocolate (ISO 80) - Described by Impossible Project as "medium-speed and medium-contrast coaterless, Chocolate print film". This is the same formula as the original square Chocolate film.

100 Sepia (ISO 1500) - According to Impossible Project, this film provides "sharp clear detail, smoother, more consistent backgrounds. Balanced for average daylight (5500°K)."

Fuji FP-100C

Fuji FP-100C Silk

Fuji FP-100B

Fuji FP-400B

Fuji FP-3000B


Type 80 Peel-apart Films, 3.25 x 3.375

Type 84 (ISO 100 BW) - The square equivalent of Type 664. Described by Polaroid as "medium-speed, medium-contrast sheet film for black and white prints. Coaterless, wide tonal range, intended for exposures of 1/10 second or faster, matches speed of ISO 100 chrome films."

Type 85 (ISO 80 BW - print and negative) - The square version of Type 665. Described by Polaroid as "medium-speed, medium-contrast, fine-grain film which produces high quality black and white prints and negatives suitable for enlarging."

Type 87 (ISO 3000 BW) - The square version of Type 667. Described by Polaroid as "high-speed, black and white coaterless print film. Designed for low-level ambient lighting conditions and high-speed events that require a fast film."

Type 88 (ISO 75 color) - The square equivalent of Type 108.

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Type 88 Polacolor 2 (ISO 75 color) - Described by Polaroid as "a new, improved color film. Its dyes have greater stability and pictures made with this film will have deeper, richer colors".

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Type 88 (ISO 80 color) - The square version of Type 669. Described by Polaroid as "medium-contrast, medium-speed, daylight (5500°K), (electronic flash) balanced color print film with extended dynamic range."


Type 89 (ISO 100 color) - The square version of Type 690. Polaroid described it as "Medium-speed, medium-contrast, medium-grain, daylight and electronic flash balanced (5500°K) color print film. It’s easy to use, professional quality instant film, with sharp, bright, well-saturated colors, anytime, every time."

Viva (ISO 80 color) - Not sold in the U.S., described by Polaroid as "medium-contrast, medium-speed, daylight (5500°K), (electronic flash) balanced color print film with extended dynamic range."

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Viva (ISO 80 color) - Not sold in the U.S. The same as Viva with a textured/matte surface, described by Polaroid as "medium-contrast, medium-speed, daylight (5500°K), (electronic flash) balanced color print film with extended dynamic range."

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Viva (ISO 125 color) - Not sold in the U.S. market, probably the square version of Studio 125 or 125i.


Viva 3000 (ISO 3000 black and white) - The same film as Type 87.

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Chocolate (ISO 100) - The precursor to 100 Chocolate.


A guide to using peel-apart pack film can be found here in pdf format.
Looking at this list, I actually have quite a few types in the fridge that I haven't used before. Time to stop sitting on them and shoot! This list will be updated with examples and new film types, if any more exist.

13 comments:

  1. I REALLY enjoyed this post! I shoot quite a bit of peel apart myself and it's great to see samples of some of the films I have yet to try - Thanks!

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  2. Anonymous7:04 PM

    Thank you so much for posting this. It's a great resource and I've been waiting for a new post on this blog. I own 70+ cameras, mostly Polaroid and toy cameras so this is a perfect blog for me. Thanks!

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  3. Brilliant. I've only used Fuji FP 100C so far, but now I want mooore! Thanks for the great post!

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  4. a14568:44 AM

    cool stuff, Maybe add the two speeds for 690? (100 and 125) ;)

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  5. I recall buying 663 5 years ago at a shop in Japan. Pretty sure it's Japanese.

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  6. Thanks for the great rundown of the different polaroid films. That blue shot of the desert is killer.

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  7. thanks for the great listing

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  8. Hi Moominsean, your blog is too outstanding and eye catching,you should try website to increase visitor.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Anonymous12:58 AM

    Dude - how do you get the edging like on the FP-100c sample?

    Thanks = -great pics!

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  10. you're a/the photographic resource for polaroid!

    Including the images from the actual film is exactly what Polaroid should have done.

    thx Jan

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  11. what a great sharing

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  12. hello there,

    I’m shooting on type 100 Sepia, Blue, Chocolate and Fuji FP-100C and I getting crazy looking around on hints to take care of the negatives. Sepia ones seems to stay clear during time, Chocolate ones are totally black and Blue ones are really weird: they’re kind of positive instead of negative, with more natural colors than the actual picture, but they become really dark in time, almost black, but under water the image come back to life, then dark again. Is there a way to treat the negatives to prevent them from disappearing or something? And I successfully tried bleaching FP-100C negative but i’m not sure on how to protect the emulsion side of it. Any hints for that? I couldn’t find anything online : (

    Thanks in advance

    ReplyDelete